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2012-13 School Year
The Art One Courses will be taught this year by Mrs. Katie Thompson
thompson.k@generalmclane.org

Welcome to the General McLane Art One wiki page! Use the navigation on the LEFT to help you navigate through the page!
Questions: Contact Mrs. Karen Hodas:
hodas.k@generalmclane.org
I make an effort to check my e-mail daily throughout the week and on weekends!


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About the Artwork
Vincent Van Gogh’s genius hauntingly shines in the swirled brushstrokes, vivid colors and distorted forms of “Starry Night.” A Dutch Grand Master, Van Gogh (1853 – 1890) was an astoundingly prolific post-Impressionist who produced all of his work in 10 years, but only sold one painting in his life. While institutionalized, Van Gogh created “Starry Night,” his most famous painting, completely from memory. It now hangs in the permanent collection in NewYork’s Museum of Modern Art.

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About the Artwork
Artistic genius Pablo Picasso (1881 – 1973) co-founded Cubism and produced a monumental 20,000 artworks during his 70-year career. Picasso’s torrential outpouring of work was so extensive and complex that art historians have divided it into individual periods. A prodigy in his youth, Picasso enrolled in advanced classes at Barcelona’s Royal Academy of Art at age 15. The strong geometric forms of his groundbreaking Cubist works redefined art as a medium that could digress from literal images of reality. Passionately creative in every genre from primitive art to sketches to Surrealism, Picasso
profoundly impacted 20th century art.

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About the Artwork
Arguably the most famous image in the art world, “Mona Lisa” was painted by Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) in 1507. Also known as “La Giaconda” referring to the last name of the model who posed for the painting, it is analyzed for its beauty, technique and style, but it is perhaps most famous for the enigmatic look and smile on Mona Lisa’s face. Her expression and the meaning behind it have survived for 500 years as one of the greatest mysteries in art history.

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About the Artwork
A founder of Impressionism, Claude Monet (1840 – 1925) broke free from the confines of traditional art to evolve into a groundbreaking landscape painter. Part of a series painted to capture a scene in various phases of daylight, his “Japanese Bridge,” features a wooden footbridge spanning his Giverny home’s lily pond. The beautiful water landscape is given the remarkable depth of a view seen through a window.

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About the Artwork
Symbolism abounds in the eerie, melting images of pioneering Surrealist artist Salvador Dali’s most famous work, “The Persistence of Memory.” Creating “hand-painted dream photographs,” Dali (1904 – 1989) portrayed fantastic visions made believable through expert rendering. Captivated by scientific breakthroughs Dali, though always evasive on theories of the painting’s meaning, may have been illustrating Einstein’s theory that time is relative, and not fixed.


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About the Artwork
French painter Henri Matisse (1869 – 1954) expressed joy through patterns, ornamentation and vivid colors. Given a paint set while recovering from an illness, Matisse described his discovery of art as “a kind of paradise.” Originally labeled a Fauvist, he produced early works that were remarkably mature. After seeing Impressionist and Japanese art, Matisse made color instrumental to his work, and experimented with expressive abstraction. He also decorated the Dominican nuns’ chapel at Vence, France when he was almost 80. Matisse, who was often nervous, relieved his tension through painting.


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About the Artwork
French painter Henri Matisse (1869 – 1954) expressed joy through patterns, ornamentation and vivid colors. Given a paint set while recovering from an illness, Matisse described his discovery of art as “a kind of paradise.” Originally labeled a Fauvist, he produced early works that were remarkably mature. After seeing Impressionist and Japanese art, Matisse made color instrumental to his work, and experimented with expressive abstraction. He also decorated the Dominican nuns’ chapel at Vence, France when he was almost 80. Matisse, who was often nervous, relieved his tension through painting.


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About the Artwork
Groundbreaking Modernist painter Georgia O’Keeffe (1887 – 1986) rejected artistic norms to express her own unique vision. Known for the flower paintings which encompass a quarter of her work, O’Keeffe was originally inspired by nature during her childhood in rural Wisconsin. Shunning her artistic education in favor of expressing her emotions, O’Keeffe enlarged flowers until they became abstract artforms whose sheer size commanded attention. An innovator who profoundly impacted 20th century art, O’Keeffe was the first woman honored with her own exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.


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About the Artwork
Picasso and Matisse have their 20th Century peer in Wassily Kandinsky (1886-1944). Kandinsky believed that art could visually express music, and is credited for painting the first modern abstractions. He was inspired by the radiantly colorful churches and homes of his native Russia. In “Farbstudie Quadrate,” color and rhythm make beautiful music together.
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About the Artwork
Rembrandt (1606 – 1669), was a Baroque artist whose masterful portrayal of complex emotions brought credibility and compassion to his art. Skillfully conveying feeling through gesture, expression, and a supreme command of light and shadow, Rembrandt meteorically rose to fame in his early 20s. His troubled and turbulent personal life, however, was riddled with tragic deaths and financial ruin incurred by his extravagance. Despite these burdens, he possessed a profound understanding of human nature and a brilliant technique which elevated him as an artist to universal significance, and which has immortalized his work.

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About the Artwork
Intellectually versatile, the brilliant Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475 – 1564) was also a skilled architect, poet and engineer. His studies of human anatomy and movement resulted in figures that were remarkably lifelike. Michelangelo’s crowning achievements were his sculptures, “Pietà” and “David,” created before he was 30, and the Sistine Chapel ceiling fresco, which was finished in four years and contained 300 figures. His eternal masterpieces were rendered in a wide range of media, and he was the first artist to have two biographies written about him in his lifetime.
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bout the Artwork
Revolutionary French Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cezanne’s rebellion against 19th century Impressionist conventions sparked the radical new world of 20th century modern art. Although he was ridiculed by critics at the time, both Picasso, Matisse, and many others cite him as an influence and accolades came post-humously. His experimentation with optical perception, geometric simplification and fractured forms, kept his style changing significantly over his lifetime. An eccentric genius, Cezenne was a solitary enigma to those who knew him best, including his own family.

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About the Artwork
Pierre Auguste Renoir’s (1841 – 1919) art celebrates life’s temporal pleasures, the ‘here and now’ of his time, more than any other Impressionist artist. Preferring to paint his friends and lovers, his masterful depictions of their candid facial features and body stances convey the youthful spirit and intimate charm that ignited the feeling of an Eden of earthly pleasures. His portrayal of luminous color, skillfully varied brushstrokes, nuances of light and shadow all worked together to form a warm sensuality that made him a leader of the Impressionist movement.


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About the Artwork
Italian Renaissance artist Raphael (1483 – 1520) painted works exemplifying his era’s ideals of beauty and harmony. A child prodigy, he exceeded the talents of the leading painter in his hometown of Urbino, Italy when he was 12. Raphael was noted for his brilliant Vatican stanzas, and the Madonnas he portrayed with unprecedented human sentiments. He also masterfully utilized depth, perspective, light and shadow, which made his figures appear warm, serene and lifelike. Pope Julius II’s respect for Raphael was so profound that he had planned to make him Cardinal.


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bout the Artwork
Like all of Gustav Klimt’s work, “The Kiss” glows with gilded erotic imagery amid swirls of flamboyant ornamentation. One of Klimt’s most inspired works, “The Kiss” submerges most of the couple’s bodies in vast golden waves, representing the melding of selves experienced by lovers. An Austrian iconoclast, Klimt (1862 – 1918) rose from childhood poverty to become an artist who significantly impacted the Viennese Secession and Art Nouveau styles.


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About the ArtworkDark and nightmarish, “The Dog” is one of Spanish artist Francisco de Goya’s famous "Black Paintings." Goya (1746 – 1828) begun working on the series after a terrible illness left him deaf and embittered. Submerged to its neck, the dog stares out from its desolate surroundings and appears to be hiding. “The Dog” is one of the most admired masterpieces in Madrid’s Museo del Prado and a favorite of living painters.

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About the Artwork
Paul Klee (1879 – 1940) was an ingenious modern art master with an extensive stylistic range. Klee created small, delicate works, filling them with traces of dreams, music, poetry, and stylistically blended primitive art, Surrealism, Cubism and children’s art. Klee’s initial pen-and-ink drawings were transformed after he visited Tunisia and became smitten with the color and light he found there. Fusing abstraction with reality, Klee fills his work with complex symbols derived from the unconscious. Klee’s work and innovations profoundly influenced 20th century Surrealism, Abstract and Nonobjective art.


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About the Artwork
The romance of the ballet is poignantly captured by French artist Edgar Degas (1834-1917). A keen observer, Degas preferred to be called a Realist, although his style is related to that of Impressionists. His innovative composition, skillful drawing, and perceptive portrayal of movement is uniquely his own. Degas also depicted social settings such as racecourses, cafes, and music halls. A profound influence on later artists, Picasso and Toulouse-Lautrec, Degas made sketches from living models to capture their spontaneity, later completing the paintings in the studio.



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About the Artwork
Although Germany’s Renaissance is lesser known than Italy, Denmark or France, Albrecht Durer is celebrated as the master of the movement. Born in 1471 in Nuremberg, Durer was a goldsmith’s apprentice to his father, but he was also an accomplished printmaker, engraver and theoretician, which sharpened his keen sense of proportion and realistic detail. His vast body of work spans nature, figurative, and fantastical religious art, even including graphic design elements. While traveling, he developed a love of Italian art, even including elements into his own work.


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About the Artwork
Abstract Expressionist pioneer Jackson Pollock (1912 – 1956) poured and dripped paint onto canvases, challenging the traditional use of an easel and brush. Deceptively childlike, Pollock’s work was actually astoundingly complex and sophisticated. Compelled by inner turmoil, Pollock used dramatic movement to pour, drip and hurl paint onto huge canvases attached to the floor. Pollock, who was influenced by Picasso, Miró and the Surrealists, expressed subconscious thoughts through his motions, and revolutionized a style of painting in which the work has no identifiable parts or focal point.


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About the Artwork
Reducing his color scheme to primary hues in “Composition with Red Blue Yellow,” Piet Mondrian (1872 – 1944) followed the shape of the canvas with deceptively simple black lines and blocks of color to create maximum impact in his Neoplastic style. Although he first painted landscapes before moving through various styles, including Cubism, to arrive at his signature grid-work style, Mondrian radically simplified form and color to reveal the basic principles beneath the visible world. Mondrian, who profoundly influenced 20th century art, also impacted graphic arts, industrial design and architecture.


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About the Artwork
Fireworks of light dazzlingly illuminate the works of British artist William Turner (1775 – 1851). Called “the painter of light” and “the great pyrotechnist,” Turner created masterfully lit scenes of land and sea. Exhibiting his first painting at the Royal Academy at age 15, and opening his own studio when he was 18, Turner produced an astounding 20,000 paintings and drawings in his lifetime. Some of his best lit work was influenced by his studies of rapidly changing weather conditions on the sea and sky in Venice. Turner, who is known for oil paintings, is also regarded as a founder of British watercolor landscape painting.